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New York Times Article
Posted by Andy on 2 September 1999, 21:20 GMT

The New York Times ran an article today about the effects of graphing calculators on education. The reporter contacted staff member Kirk Meyer a few months back about his take on the issue, which was not directly voiced in the article. However, several top quality programs that he pointed out are listed as well as a reference to our site. The article is available to be read online.

 


The comments below are written by ticalc.org visitors. Their views are not necessarily those of ticalc.org, and ticalc.org takes no responsibility for their content.


Re: New York Times Article
Gizmo  Account Info
(Web Page)

Hahaha! Good article. I didnt know much about this I.R thing, but I want ONE!

     3 September 1999, 00:32 GMT

Re: Re: New York Times Article
Joey Mavity  Account Info
(Web Page)

The IR can be found at sami.ticalc.org/irlink/e_intro.html. (Use the URL above). They're nice little things to have.

--Joey

     3 September 1999, 01:41 GMT


Re: Re: New York Times Article
Nick Disabato  Account Info
(Web Page)

I want more than one, because it's probably that I'll end up breaking a couple ;)

--BlueCalx

     3 September 1999, 03:34 GMT

Re: Re: Re: New York Times Article
Nick Disabato  Account Info
(Web Page)

Err, probably == probable. Stupid me.

--BlueCalx part 2

     3 September 1999, 04:26 GMT


Re: Re: Re: New York Times Article
Elias Cotton  Account Info

not to mention that its useless unless someone in the room has one too thus u need to outfit somebody with one...

     3 September 1999, 05:42 GMT

Re: New York Times Article
Elias Cotton  Account Info

in reference to the part about teachers wising up and clearing the calcs the teachers at my school already do that and it is done at certain accademic meets... not that i cheat or anything i just dont want my memory cleared so i thought that making a quick little interactive prog that let the teach "clear" the calcs mem might work. it was easy to do with just the basic getky and the teachs nvr suspected anything also a 'side on that gameboy thing(if one is brought to class the student is sent to the office..) well i was playin' one in class and all the teach did was ask, in front of the class mind you, what game i was playin'. since i nvr needed to pay attention anyways she could care less...

     3 September 1999, 05:53 GMT


Re: Re: New York Times Article
Nihilist9  Account Info

Yeah, that has happened to me in the past (clearing mem.) , but only during tests, however the teacher didn't want anyone playing gams at all, and I don't mind that but I do, on the other hand, mind if the calculators were cleared everytime one stepped within the bounds of the classroom. (That would perturb me to the point of game resignation because i would be fed up with having to load a game up every day, or then stop bringing my graphing calc to class [ which is prohibated in my Trig class] ).

And the thing about the SAT prog. . . . .they say it will raise your score above 600?
_If you ask me that is awfully low, wouldn't you say?_ When I was in seventh grade I took the SAT's from John Hopkins University in Baltimore (wow it was computarized, no filling in bubbles!) , and ended with a score of 640, and even without any prospect of what the SAT's would be like.

Dost anyone agree with me?

     3 September 1999, 23:39 GMT

Re: Re: Re: New York Times Article
nicholas palko  Account Info

yeah, i sort of agree

basicly, the more naive you are about the test, the more test preps help.

still, i think its disgusting that those two guys who sell programs for the 83s were even mentioned with the likes of ticalc.org.

     4 September 1999, 01:10 GMT


Re: Re: Re: New York Times Article
stallman83
(Web Page)

I definitely agree with you. 600 is a very low number and if you are able to run a calculator AND operate the program, you should have atleast an IQ of 600. I scored 890 in 6th grade and that was with no studying/preparation and no idea what the test would be like.

     4 September 1999, 06:01 GMT

Re: Re: Re: Re: New York Times Article
Bryan Rabeler  Account Info
(Web Page)

You probably didn't mean to say IQ of 600, right? You mean a SAT score of 600 I think.

     4 September 1999, 06:36 GMT

Re: Re: Re: Re: New York Times Article
Nick Disabato  Account Info
(Web Page)

Oh, and how did you get an 890 if the math test is out of 800 points :) Unless you mean 890 composite...

--BlueCalx

     4 September 1999, 17:44 GMT


Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: New York Times Article
Elias Cotton  Account Info

i hope that he is just misreming cause 8900composite youd have to intentional miss probs....

     5 September 1999, 07:27 GMT


Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: New York Times Article
Nick Disabato  Account Info
(Web Page)

Actually, 890 composite is a decent score for a sixth grader. The national average for normal juniors who take the SAT is 1050.

--BlueCalx

     5 September 1999, 17:32 GMT


Re: Re: Re: Re: New York Times Article
stallman83
(Web Page)

Sorry everyone...big typo (I make a lot of stupid typos and stuff when I'm typing). I meant SAT composite of 890. I'm shooting to score a 1400 next year.

By the way, I had a 530 on the math section (360 on english...haha)

     6 September 1999, 00:01 GMT

Re: New York Times Article
lilroehm Account Info

I am appalled at the "enterprise" that these teens are trying to pull off. I've taken the SAT twice so far, and my best score was the first time I ever took it, 720 (i'm hoping to get higher next time). I used my trusty 86, but for nothing more than computational functions that I could just have easily used any calculator for. There aren't complex enough equations on the SAT that require such applications, especially what seem to be just, as was said before, dumbed down versions of TI's own Equation Solver which I already have on my 86. And then to _charge_ for the programs? That's ridiculous. I guarantee that you could find equivalents to each of the programs that they have written. And this "guarantee" seems shady to me. What will they do if you don't raise your scores, pay for you to take it again? *sigh* The only sad part is, they will probably find takers who will pay for it......

     4 September 1999, 17:34 GMT

Re: New York Times Article
nerdguy  Account Info
(Web Page)

I think the NY Times should just mind their own bisness. They're making us sound like the scum on bottom of your shoe, like the press does to all people who know more that those s*** reporters, just because we have assembly programs on our calcs. They could at least give the other side of the story. Assembly makes more citical thinkers. Personally, my experence with assembly has made me structure my thoughts more effeciently, and did help me with my grades.

     5 September 1999, 00:14 GMT

Re: Re: New York Times Article
Kirk Meyer  Account Info
(Web Page)

Actually, I found it to be pretty good... Notice that the article ends with a *teacher* saying that she thought the calculators were a good influence. I got some negative vibes about the SAT thing, but I think overall it was positive...

     5 September 1999, 00:30 GMT


Re: Re: Re: New York Times Article
Justin Karneges  Account Info
(Web Page)

Yeah I felt the same way sorta.

I saw the article start out with the two guys selling BASIC programs. That was mildly annoying. But then the article went on to bring up the "students vs. teachers" thing where students use their calculators as gameboys in disguise, and how they were playing games like Pacman, etc. This really got to me because they didn't give any credit (at least I didn't see it) to assembly programmers. Although they didn't mention any games specifically by name, they could have at least referenced the assembly programmers as a whole. I mean where do they think these programs come from? All they say is that students can download gameboy-like games for their calculators. As if TI or Nintendo makes them.

I was happy to see Sami got credit in the article for his infrared work, however.

Anyway the first half of the article bugged me, but yeah the second half made up for it.

     5 September 1999, 05:01 GMT


Re: Re: Re: Re: New York Times Article
Nick Disabato  Account Info
(Web Page)

I frowned upon the first part (which most people read, then skip the rest); 99.9% of the TI community contains freeware programs, most of which are open source. It leads people to become misinformed about us and what most program authors stand for. Shame, too...

--BlueCalx

     5 September 1999, 06:00 GMT


Re: Re: New York Times Article
jeepfuncj7 Account Info

A requirment for my major that I am fulfilling now is a class on programming the Motorola 68000 chip in assembly language. Kind of ironic that they are inferring that assembly is bad for in school when school is teaching assembly for the chip that is in the TI-89 and TI-92(+). I think that sounds right Long day at work, so if it doesn't, use your imagination. :-)

     5 September 1999, 05:31 GMT

Re: New York Times Article
dudeguy  Account Info
(Web Page)

Hey guess what the kids that are selling the programs have an account on ticalc.org

     5 September 1999, 15:22 GMT


Re: Re: New York Times Article
nicholas palko  Account Info

are you suggesting that some flames are in order?

nick

     5 September 1999, 18:50 GMT


Re: Re: Re: New York Times Article
dudeguy  Account Info
(Web Page)

no im just mentioning it

     5 September 1999, 19:13 GMT


Re: Re: Re: Re: New York Times Article
Nick Disabato  Account Info
(Web Page)

It's a free country :)

--BlueCalx

     5 September 1999, 23:14 GMT

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: New York Times Article
dudeguy  Account Info
(Web Page)

But their program isnt

     6 September 1999, 00:46 GMT


Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: New York Times Article
DOZIEDO  Account Info
(Web Page)

It's free, but hey, a little peer pressure couldn't hurt ;)

     6 September 1999, 00:50 GMT

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