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HP-49 vs. TI-89
Posted by Nick on 18 September 1999, 22:23 GMT

A minor blurb: Techno-Plaza has an interesting document comparing the 89 to the new HP-49. It offers a very interesting comparison, but it does seem slightly biased towards the TI-89.

 


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Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
stealth  Account Info

Well... in my mind, the 89 is the best.. no doubt about it. You just can't beat it.

     19 September 1999, 00:58 GMT


Re: Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
Bengt Werstén  Account Info
(Web Page)

Yes, HP Sux.
TI-Rulez.

Bengt Werstén

     2 February 2000, 14:33 GMT

Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
Skavoovie  Account Info

The 89 rules! I was just wondering if anyone knows when ROM 2.0 is coming out.

     19 September 1999, 01:41 GMT


Re: Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
Wells Sample  Account Info

I would like to know weather either of you actually own an hp-49 calculator to compare it to the 89, or are just making statements cause you only on the 89. I would really like to hear from people who have BOTH calculators about this topic, and not just like "89 is the best in the world." (don't get me wrong I like hearing people saying the 89 is a great calculator)

     19 September 1999, 02:25 GMT

Re: Re: Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
[ccsw]  Account Info
(Web Page)

I own both of the calcs. Both have their strong points, but I do perfer my TI-89 for its ease of use and well documented (BASIC) features. Also I only take my TI-89 to school and not my HP as it looks kinda of fruity, and is kinda slow :P

     19 September 1999, 02:34 GMT

Re: Re: Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
Skavoovie  Account Info

I do not own a 49 and have never used one. All my comment meant was that I liked my 89. No disrespect meant towards the 49. I may even get one if I can find one. So far I haven't seen any in stores.

     19 September 1999, 03:27 GMT

Re: Re: Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
John Ratliff  Account Info
(Web Page)

I own both calcs. Good thing since I did the comparison. ;->

There are good things about both calcs, and that's what I tried to put in the comparison. However there are some things the TI-89 will do that the HP49G won't and vice-versa.

It's more your preference based on RPN usage, brand loyalty (i.e. if you own a TI-85 and want to move up, there's a GOOD chance you'll be buying an 89, not a 49), price (the 49 DOES cost more than the 89), purpose (the 49 has a lot more real-world support vs classroom standing with the TI's), and other misc. things.

     19 September 1999, 07:01 GMT


Re: Re: Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
slow_poke  Account Info

I own the HP49G, HP48GX and the TI-89. I bought the TI-89 because of its calculus functions and extra memory. Unfortunately, during every test I would reach for my HP because of its RPN and equation writer functions. By-the-way, in all of my EE classes the professors only give test problems with numeric answers. I suppose for the mathematical purist the TI-89 would be a good calc, but for someone like me who has taken 4 quarters of calc and 1 quarter of linear algebra (without the help of a calculator), I only need it to do the grunt work (calculations). I really don't like getting bogged down with wether or not I have the parenthesis in the right place. This is where the HP's shine. For me the HP49G is a natural extension of how we normally think.
By-the-way, I started out with a TI-85, but once I got my hands on a HP48GX the TI was history.
Of course you know that everything I have written is only "MY OPINION."

     23 September 1999, 02:52 GMT


Re: Re: Re: Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
Elias Cotton  Account Info

the ti86 didnt care about parenthesis what was the reason for the 89 changing that andbtw what is rpn aside from being reverse polish notation what does that mean....?

     24 September 1999, 03:21 GMT

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
Nathan Haines  Account Info
(Web Page)

The TI-86 is descended 85-82-83-86.

The TI-89 is descended 92-{89/92 Plus}.

As you can see, they have no common ancestor. The TI-92 has always cared about parenthesis. Hope that answers your question. :)

     24 September 1999, 08:11 GMT


Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
John Ratliff  Account Info
(Web Page)

> the ti86 didnt care about parenthesis

If that were true, then 1/x+1 and 1/(x+1) would be the same. How would it differentiate between them? All TI calculators care about parentheses, they just don't always use them in functions. The sine of x would be SIN X on the TI-86, but sin(x) on the TI-89. Is this what you mean?

> what is rpn aside from being reverse polish notation
> what does that mean....?

Basically, RPN is entering the arguments before a function. Like 2 + 2 become 2 ENTER 2 +
Or a better example would be (x+1)/x+2
x ENTER 1 + x ENTER / 2 +
It eliminates the need for parentheses and can be more efficient when the person is well versed in its usage.

This is VERY similar to the way (in many cases identical) a computer actually handles data, so it's easier for the processor. It could also be called post-fix notation. I had to learn a stupid list processing language called Scheme in my intro to comp sci class which used pre-fix notation, i.e. 2 + 2 would be + 2 2. Generally, we use in-fix notation. 2 + 2 = 2 + 2. The operator is IN between the operands. Post-fix/Pre-fix is generally easier for a computer to handle because it doesn't have to be parsed. It gets the function(s) and does them, or else it waits until it has the arguments, then gets the function.

There is also something called the STACK which is similar to the history on a TI-89/92, but with more power to manipulate things. All processors (I think all) have stacks where data is stored and manipulated. You often use the stack when making OS calls in assembly (whether it be 68k, x86, or z80).

Hope that cleared some things up. RPN is a bit more intricate than that, but you don't really need to know unless you plan to use it.

     27 September 1999, 04:05 GMT

Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
TipDS

I also like the 89 for it's fantastic interface and ease of use. There is something to be said, however, for the HP and their extensive library of commercial software for professionals. For example, civil engineers have virtually nothing for the 89. I think that keeps a large portion of these folks in the HP camp. That, and the fact that the HP4X family has a time tested math core. HP's are kinda like the Model-T's... They ain't pretty, but they're functional. (No flames, please. I already said I prefer the 89 - O.K.!)

Chicka-bow, chicka-bow-wow,
Tip DS

     19 September 1999, 02:33 GMT

Re: Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
Nick Disabato  Account Info
(Web Page)

BAH! If anyone flames you for liking the 49, they sux bad... each calculator has its merits, and you're free to express your opinions about the HP's, even on a TI site :)
As for the 49 myself... dang they need to manufacture that in less ugly colors.

--BlueCalx

     19 September 1999, 03:26 GMT

Re: Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
Sir_Toby  Account Info
(Web Page)

> For example, civil engineers have virtually nothing for the 89.

lol, unless they want to play Mario or Tetris or something... I agree. The 89 has more emphasis on classroom support, and all a student really needs (or think he needs) in the classroom is the adequate calc software (in this case, it's pretty much all built-in) and games (90% of this page). The HP was created in such a way that it could be used more efficiently by "calculator power users" (or so I'm told- I've never actually used one) The 89 obviously wasn't built with civil engineers in mind and the HP wasn't designed to fit in the classroom. Both calculators fulfill their purpose equally well.

But since this is a TI calculator site, the 89 is better.

     19 September 1999, 07:48 GMT

Re: Re: Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
Nick Disabato  Account Info
(Web Page)

I can think of at least fifty-six civil engineers who play SMQ on a daily basis. :)

89 == classroom
4x == post-classroom

But HP's ad campaign to get the classroom audience to use the 4x'es will take a long time, if ever.

--BlueCalx

     19 September 1999, 18:54 GMT


Re: Re: Re: Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
TipDS

What's SMQ, anyhow?

Seriously... well, maybe not,
Tip DS

     20 September 1999, 03:41 GMT


Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
Elias Cotton  Account Info

Super Mario Quest

     20 September 1999, 04:12 GMT

Re: Re: Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
TipDS

You have a point... Now, let me catch my breath after that laughing spell. That was quite funny.

<Chuckling into the distance>,
Tip DS

     20 September 1999, 03:35 GMT


Re: Re: Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
Alasun9  Account Info
(Web Page)

Different purposes, different designs, etc. It's like comparing a strategy guide to a cheat book. As far as the classroom is concerned, the TI is usually more popular, and thus, you can share programs and games more easily by using the same calculator as everyone else.

     20 September 1999, 08:27 GMT


Re: Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
PSInferno  Account Info

True, both calculators are excellent calculators. I use a TI-89, and my experience with the HP-49G comes from HPs own emulator for it. They both can do things that the other can't, and the HP-49G has features the TI-89 doesn't (like a clock, and alarms)

HP was the first company to come out with a graphing calculator if I remember correctly, and it wasn't for students. It was aimed the engineering, and industry fields. That, and when the first HP-28s' came out their price was a little prohibitive. It was around $400 if I remember correctly.

HP still has a large market share in the engineering field with the HP-48G series. There are companies that have even built portable data aquisition systems for them. I don't anyone has done anything like that with a TI-89. The closest thing probably would be daVinci producing the EE*Pro FLASH software, but that was aimed at electrical engineering students.

TI is aimed at the educational market, and to be honest this is only HPs second attempt at a graphing calculator for the educational market. The first was the HP-38G, which was a big flop. What is truly ironic is that the design of the HP-49G (which I personally like), has offended many engineers. Some have gone to the extent of saying in newsgroups that they would not buy it, or any other HP product because of its design, but I think thats childish and going overboard.

Personally, I'd like to see more people doing with their TIs that I see going on with people doing to their HP-48G series calculators. I have seen several documents showing how to take the $80 HP-49G, and give it more RAM than a HP-48GX (512K to 4MB). I'd love to hear of someone succesfully taking a TI-89 and adding 4MB of RAM, or someone taking a TI-92 and adding an AC adapter plug with a RAM expansion system.

     19 September 1999, 23:03 GMT

Re: Re: Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
TipDS

"I'd like to see more people doing with their TIs that I see going on with people doing to their HP-48G series calculators." -- PSInferno

Does overclocking count? There is also a site that tells users how to add a backlight to the 89/92. I guess that's for kids that have to go to bed early, but still want to play games under the covers.

Later,
Tip DS

     20 September 1999, 03:40 GMT


Re: Re: Re: Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
Elias Cotton  Account Info

wasnt there also a power supply for the ticalcs that charged the batteries and how bout the ir links i think that software aside the owners of these calcs have been doing quite a bit leave them alone and come back who knows what will be there when you do..

     20 September 1999, 04:03 GMT


Re: Re: Re: HP-49 vs. TI-89
zeromegax Account Info

I'd like to add that the memory expansions are internal, with slots. Nothing like SPInterface carts. 4MB upgrade internal is very impressive, and the fact that it's possible to make your own memory upgrades is more impressive.

     20 September 1999, 04:07 GMT

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