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   Home :: Community :: Surveys :: Do you use your calculator at your job?
Results
Choice Votes   Percent
Yes, it's essential that I use it! 13 8.6%   
Sometimes I use it, but it's only for simple math 8 5.3%   
No, but I bring my calculator to my job 6 3.9%   
I don't have a job, but I'm using my calculator in a summer class 10 6.6%   
I have a job, but I'm ONLY using my calculator in a summer class 4 2.6%   
I don't have a job, I'm not taking a class, BUT I am using my calculator! 69 45.4%   
My calculator is slowly collecting dust 42 27.6%   

Survey posted 2005-06-30 03:43 by Jon.

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Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
Jonathan Katz  Account Info
(Web Page)

I have to apologize about the "summer job" part; I didn't mean to exclude anyone in the southern hemisphere!

Reply to this comment    30 June 2005, 03:47 GMT


Re: Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
Timmc Account Info
(Web Page)

"I feel so invisible down here. :'("

Reply to this comment    2 July 2005, 09:36 GMT

Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
edenist  Account Info
(Web Page)

Thats ok. The winter is pretty poor here atm anyway. lol.

Would have liked a "I dont use my calc at work, but I use it at home" option though. That could have made it more general.

Reply to this comment    30 June 2005, 04:22 GMT

Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
Mr.Z Account Info
(Web Page)

I am indeed using my calculators. I am disassembling the TI-81 ROM (including naming the routines, since the disassembly is already finished (I am really bored right now, since I have temporarily run out of AI ideas :) (& yes, I do program in LISP sometimes))), which involves my TI-92+ for hexadecimal arithmetic & a real TI-81 because the emulator's keys are arranged horribly (since it was not designed to emulate a TI-81).

Reply to this comment    30 June 2005, 04:37 GMT

Re: Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
Andrew Benner  Account Info

Ti-81 :D :( Boring, by the way, how old is that calculator

Reply to this comment    30 June 2005, 12:33 GMT


Re: Re: Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
Mr.Z Account Info
(Web Page)

Mine (which has ROM version 1.8K) says "Copyright (C)1991" on the back, so quite old. I am not sure if there were any earlier ROM versions, but my dad's has a later one.

Reply to this comment    30 June 2005, 16:26 GMT


Re: Re: Re: Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
Coolv  Account Info
(Web Page)

Hmmm... See here.

ยป TI-81 (1990)
The TI-81, TI's first graphing calculator, was designed for algebra and precalculus. It has since been replaced by newer models which have faster processors, more memory, and popular features such as linking capability and flash upgradability. The TI-81 drew little in the way of third-party games and other programs, since the code must be typed into the calculator by hand.

But it'd be cool to have a total 81 emulator for the 68k calc. Possible?

Reply to this comment    3 July 2005, 03:04 GMT

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
CajunLuke  Account Info
(Web Page)

Sure... no ROM needed... just make it act like an 81 would (like Mac-81 or PC-81).

Reply to this comment    3 July 2005, 18:07 GMT


Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
Mr.Z Account Info
(Web Page)

One could probably do full emulation, because the TI-81 hardware is very simple. Its processor runs at 2MHz, while the HW2 68K's run at 12MHz (with a better processor), so it could theoretically run at full speed. The worst part would be keypad emulation.

Reply to this comment    4 July 2005, 04:13 GMT


Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
Coolv  Account Info
(Web Page)

Oh yeah, I see what you mean. :)

Reply to this comment    4 July 2005, 18:13 GMT


Re: Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
sigma  Account Info

>> (...(...(...yes, I do program in LISP sometimes)))

I couldn't tell :-).

Reply to this comment    30 June 2005, 17:46 GMT

Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
Jake Griffin  Account Info
(Web Page)

I am not taking any classes, and I don't use my calculator at work, so I had to vote that it's collecting dust even though I occasionally use it at home for programming purposes...I'm currently trying to figure out how to convert numbers to "base pi" where pi (base 10) = 10 (base pi), pi^2 (base 10) = 100 (base pi), etc...

Reply to this comment    30 June 2005, 06:07 GMT

Re: Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
Andy Janata  Account Info
(Web Page)

How on earth can a non-integer base work very well? o.o

Reply to this comment    30 June 2005, 11:18 GMT

Re: Re: Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
Mr.Z Account Info
(Web Page)

Actually, base Phi works quite well. For example, Phi+Phi^-2=2, so 2 in base Phi would be 1.01. You just use digits up to int(base) if the base is not an integer. Unfortunately, I know of no way to get a non-integral number of distinct digits.

Reply to this comment    30 June 2005, 16:23 GMT


Re: Re: Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
PGK Account Info

I don't know, what about the exponential function e? We use that one a whole heck of a lot for growth/decay functions (shuddering at remembering horrid differential equations problems)

Reply to this comment    5 July 2005, 13:37 GMT


Re: Re: Re: Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
Mr.Z Account Info
(Web Page)

Wrong type of base. You are thinking of a base for logarithms & powers, while the other posts were referring to bases in which numbers are written, although e can be used for the latter, also.

Reply to this comment    5 July 2005, 22:30 GMT

Re: Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
Mr.Z Account Info
(Web Page)

Take Int(mod(#,pi)) (or whatever syntax on your calculator of choice) to get the next digit (it gives the 1's place first). Then, replace # with (#-[the digit you got])/pi. Stop when # gets to 0. The only problem is that it does not support digits after the "decimal" point in base pi, which would be necessary to properly represent normal integers & such, so this is just an approximation.

Reply to this comment    30 June 2005, 16:20 GMT


Am taking, not using
slimey_limey  Account Info
(Web Page)

I think mod( doesn't allow non-integer modul\=\i. At least it doesn't on the TI-89.

I'm a high school intern at Microsoft. A significant proportion of the interns are Linux users, as are many who work in my department (mouse & keyboard drivers/support software).

Reply to this comment    1 July 2005, 03:16 GMT

Re: Am taking, not using
Mr.Z Account Info
(Web Page)

It works on both my TI-86 & my TI-92+, so I think it should work on the TI-89 also.

Reply to this comment    2 July 2005, 15:40 GMT


Re: Am taking, not using
PGK Account Info

Oh, boy, Linux users working at Microsoft. I guess the Gentoo guy brought along a bunch of friends, right?

BTW, compiling TiLP leads to a "registry missing" error on my SuSE 9.3 box. Any help or RPMs of the TiLP packages newer than a year ago would be helpful.

Reply to this comment    5 July 2005, 13:40 GMT


Re: Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
Jonathan Pezzino  Account Info
(Web Page)

I recently wrote a "Base Converter" program that can convert base n to base m, for all n and m where n and m are positive integers up to 62. For example, it can parse your name into a base 10 number (since you can write out your name in base 62). Nifty, huh?

Reply to this comment    1 July 2005, 16:16 GMT


Re: Re: Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
Mr.Z Account Info
(Web Page)

Base 62 seems wasteful if you are just encoding your name. Base 27 would seem to be a better choice (so it would allow spaces between first & middle & last). Also, why not allow up to base 95? ASCII has enough characters (or 94 if you do not want to use spaces) (though I suppose it might be hard to type some characters on some calculators).

Reply to this comment    2 July 2005, 19:56 GMT


Re: Re: Re: Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
Jonathan Pezzino  Account Info
(Web Page)

It wasn't really intended for name encoding. It was intended for general purpose base conversion and compression. However, base 62 isn't wasteful because it means you can type in both lower and upper case. (Sorry, no spaces; what if there were a space at the end of the number?) Anyway, what I have been using it for thus far is as an image compressor. I wrote a program that looks at a group of pixels, parses them into a 33-bit binary number (the largest binary number possible without losing precision), which the program then converts into a base 62 number. Using this method, you can compress the entire picture into a string that takes up about 500 bytes of memory.

Reply to this comment    5 July 2005, 15:35 GMT

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
Mr.Z Account Info
(Web Page)

In that case, nifty.

Reply to this comment    5 July 2005, 21:40 GMT

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
Mr.Z Account Info
(Web Page)

At any rate, a larger base would result in a smaller string, at the possible expense of taking longer to encode (since bases over 63 would require an extra bit, causing the divide routine to run 1 extra iteration). Plus, base 64 would be particularly convenient because you could use a simple lookup string (rather than the base-conversion formula) to encode/decode it. Just my 0.16 bits worth.

Reply to this comment    5 July 2005, 21:52 GMT


Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Do you use your calculator at your job?
burntfuse  Account Info
(Web Page)

Wow, great compression method! How large were the pics to begin with?

Reply to this comment    6 July 2005, 19:14 GMT

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